Fall and Winter Hair tips

Fall and Winter Hair tips

Different seasons require different hair care techniques to maintain healthy hair. While you might wear your hair out much more often in the summer and rely on carefree styles when it’s warm outside, your hair routine will change during the fall and winter months.  To maintain healthy locks, here are some winter hair care tips that will keep your tresses in great shape so that when spring rolls around, your hair will be ready to face warm weather in good health.

 

  • Beware of Breakage: For starters if your experience breakage in certain areas, it may not have anything to do with your current hair care, but what you wear on it. Wool hats and scarves can rub against and pull on delicate black hair, breaking it off at the nape of your neck (where the scarf might sit) or at the crown of your head. You need a hat and scarf if you live in a snowy climate, but the trick is wearing them the right way to avoid damage. Try sewing a satin or silk lining inside your wool cap. If you’re not crafty enough to do this, ask a friend or family member who is.
  • Deep Conditioning Often: Heated homes and work spaces can dry out your hair, so to combat that dryness, extra treatments are necessary. Look for products that lock in moisture and have a water base. You should treat your hair once a week
  • Wet Less Often: Most people do not want to leave their house with wet hair in winter, So if your go –to- style was wash and go in the morning during the summer months, now it’s time to switch it up, it’s best to prep you’re at night and then lightly mist in the morning. If you live in very frigid climate, your hair may actually freeze and break if you went outside with wet hair. The winter months requires less daily shampooing and more misting with leave in conditioners and in some cases conditioning rinses. You should still shampoo and condition about once a week.
  • Use Heat Less: Indoor spaces will be warm enough and would probably absorb the moisture out of your skin and hair. Don’t help it along by abusing the flat Iron, blow dryer and curling irons. If you must press out your hair, get it done once week by a professional (someone who knows how to gage the temperature according to hair type) and continue up keep with techniques that don’t require heat to style such as, pin-curls, wraps or roller/rod sets.
  • Never Shampoo Hair in Hot Water: High water temperatures can damage hair and promote frizz, use lukewarm water for hair shampooing. Always make the final hair rinse cold. Cold water seals the hair’s cuticle which protects hair shine. Blot excess water out of hair; never rub with a towel that will create tangles. Since hair is at its weakest point when wet, comb out wet hair with a wide toothed comb to prevent hair breakage. Swap regular shampoo out for a clarifying shampoo once a month to remove product buildup on hair and scalp
  • Change your regimen, something’s to consider as the season change, your curls which are already prone to dryness, craves more moisture during the cooler months and it  dries up a lot more than usual. It’s best to avoid humectants in your products during the winter months. Common humectants include honey, glycerin, panthenol, hydrolyzed wheat protein, and propylene glycol. These ingredients are great summer staples, because they draw moisture from humid air into thirsty strands. During the winter, they have the opposite effect, potentially drawing out the moisture from your hair. You should always change your shampoo and conditioning regimen depending on the season.
  • Focus on products that contain ingredients such as:
  • All products main ingredient should start out with purified water
  • Tea tree- to create balance of natural oils.
  • Shea-butter- Provide moisture
  • Olive oil- help seal cuticle
  • Aloe-Vera: heals the cuticle and scalp

Some products we recommend:

Scalp: Jane Carter Scalp replenishing Serum

Pre-treatment: Jane Carter Scalp Renew

Shampoo: NPE Lavender Moisture Shampoo or Revitalize (Products of Nature)

Conditioner: NPE Lavender Moisture Conditioner

Treatments: Shea Butter Treatment by (Savannah)

Leave-in-conditioner: Jane carter Moisture Mist or 7 Seconds Unite

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